Blogging about research: Confidence of speech-language pathology students regarding communicating with people with aphasia

Admittedly, I was running short of ideas on what to review this month as I haven’t been reading much while I’ve been trying to make headway on my own projects. So I was grateful to come across Tricia McCabe’s (@tricmc) tweet linking to the following paper presenting results of a questionnaire of speech pathology students on their confidence in communicating with people with aphasia.  While the content of the paper may be fairly niche, I think it’s a topic that many clinicians will empathise with.

A review of:

Finch, E., Fleming, J., Brown, K., et al. (2013). The confidence of speech-language pathology students regarding communicating with people with aphasia. BMC Medical Education, 13:92.

Premise of the article

Communicating with people with aphasiaThe article begins by outlining the familiar sentiments that aphasia is a condition that has limited public awareness and that people with aphasia encounter participation restrictions as a result of difficulties in communicating with people who are generally unable to communicate effectively with people with aphasia. It There is then evidence cited that has suggested that practicing speech pathologists are not always able to effectively communicate with people with aphasia. The article then leads quite naturally to its main question of investigating how confident speech pathology students are in their ability to communicate effectively with people with aphasia. Read more of this post