Tempus fugit, and, My own little service evaluation/improvement exercise

So, it’s obviously been a while since the last post. Two months does go by quite quickly when it’s semester time and there are many things going on at the same time. That’s not to say there hasn’t been the time to blog but when I did have spare time (i.e. my own time) I chose to do things that were a little less productive and probably less useful.

But anyway, in the meantime I had opened a poll to see what the readers of this blog are interested in reading about and therefore what I should attempt to focus my writing on – my attempt to be evidence based (!). The leading topic in this poll was posts around Evidence Based Practice, which I was pleased with for a couple of reasons. Firstly, my previous 3 posts were on this topic so I assume they were well received especially as they attracted some comments and some Twitter interactions. Secondly, I think it demonstrates a desire for SLTs working in both clinical and research settings to attempt to improve their own application of EBP. Now we all know that we should be applying EBP in everything we do but naturally this is sometimes easier said than done so I will be attempting to offer what I can by way of resources and discussion.

Nice graph

Twitpoll results

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Note/Promise to self

Reporting on aphasia/SLT stuffI’ll begin to use this blog to summarise some nice things I read related to aphasia and speech therapy.

Been inspired by excellent Research Digest blog by British Psychological Society. Not intending to be quite as productive and comprehensive as this but it will give me added motivation to write something when other ideas are thin on the ground.

I’ll keep up with other content as well but as I’m struggling to keep up with my plan of 1 blog post per week this will hopefully give me more inspiration.It’ll also encourage me to keep reading and appraising stuff rather than just re-tweeting links to articles and/or printing stuff out and adding them to my ever-growing pile of ‘things to read’.